Spacific presents:

Soaked Oats

Soaked Oats

Servant Jazz Quarters, London, GB

£8
Entry Requirements: 18+
General Admission (e-ticket)
$11.65 + $1.46 s/c

Soaked Oats are a young four-piece band hailing from Dunedin, New Zealand who have been described as "a southern stew of Kevin Morby and LCD Soundsystem with a good shake of Mac DeMarco “. The band are making their inaugural trip to the motherland this May to perform at The Great Escape in Brighton. Following their appearance there, Soaked Oats are going to bring their endearing live performance to London’s Servants Jazz Quarters on Monday the 13th of May, 2019.

Their latest single ‘Shuggah Doom’ is a tale of self reflection on perception laid out as a film script - check out the video here.

Line Up

Soaked Oats are a young four-piece band hailing from Dunedin, New Zealand who have been described as "a southern stew of Kevin Morby and LCD Soundsystem with a good shake of Mac DeMarco ". Shoulder tapped as “the new Dunedin sound” by The Spinoff website described as “a sort of psychedelic surf rock infused with a general frothiness”.

Since forming in early 2017 the band have come to notoriety for writing songs about stoned fruit ('Avocado Aficionado', 'I'm a Peach'), completing a multitude of tours around home country New Zealand, selling out dates in Australia and undertaking a 10 thousand mile / 20 date tour of the United States in a 1980's R.V.. Along the way they've become known for endearing live performances showcasing the band's penchant for joyous songwriting and high energy shows. As well as touring prolifically, the band have released three EPs in their short existence. Tour Supports have included : Tiny Ruins (NZ), Hockey Dad (AU).

The band is made up of lead vocalist Oscar Mein who scribes the clever, witty and thoughtful observations on life. And fruit. Guitarist, Henry Francis and his amazing pedal-board is on the noble path to tone mastery making the instrument sound like it was made by unicorns. Rhythm section Max Holmes (bass) and Conor Feehly (drums) provide the backbone, the funk and keep the party going.

Bold colours and dancing beats cut nicely through the grizzly cold of the NZ winter, warming the bones with relevant words and pop/rock’n’roll rhythms." - NZ Musician